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Category Archives: Artworks

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A reproduction of the visual element of “The Field”, and installation piece by Constance Merriman.

Filmed by a motion-sensing still camera over the course of several months, in a field in a suburban bedroom community of Pittsbugh, Pennsylvania.

It takes time to know a place. Yet location changes over time. What does it mean to understand a place within a constantly changing landscape?

We make our homes our location by the daily habits of living, by the activities of everyday life. This is grounding for us. We are observers, and we chose to study our landscapes by looking deeply over time through the windows in our homes, our dwellings. We are behind the camera, and sometimes there is evidence of us in our photos as reflections in the windows. Connie has deep roots in her dwelling. Noel is searching for roots in a temporary place.

We have teamed as collaborators before, working on environmental projects in the same studio space. Now Noel studies in England and Connie continues her work in Pittsburgh. We perceive our current distance. There is a subtle timelessness implied in distant places and when friends are separated, they take on the quality of a memory instead of the fresh engagements which occur in one location. This exhibit has provided us the opportunity to work together again, not in the same studio, but in real time.

As landscape painters, we both deal with notions of time and how it flows through space. Now we present to the viewers our moving paintings at the size of postcards. These are views from our windows which are captured in synchronized time in two locations on the earth. We exchanged these experiences of place and particular points of view within the world with each other and the viewers in hopes to discover and share meaning in the landscapes we live in.

~Constance Merriman and Noel Hefele

Dwelling is about the rich intimate ongoing togetherness of beings and things which make up landscapes and places, and which bind together nature and culture over time. It thus offers conceptual characteristics which blur the nature/culture divide and emphasise the temporal nature of landscape.

-Cloke and Jones (2001, p.651) quoted in Landscape by John Wylie

The piece at the gallery is much slower, at about 45 minutes in length.